Polish Radio National Symphony Orchestra Katowice

Polish Radio National Symphony Orchestra Katowice

Polish Radio National Symphony Orchestra Katowice

I would like a building to have its own history, spatial narration deriving from the culture of such a region as Silesia,”  said Tomasz Konior, the world-famous architect, in 2008 entrusted with designing a new home for the Polish Radio National Symphony Orchestra (NOSPR), just before the start of construction works. Some critics believe that his work is too intertwined with Katowice tradition.

The object, at Wojciech Kilar square near the renowned Spodek arena, is in their view far too barren. They criticize the façade of red brick fired in a 19th century furnace and reflecting a character of the nearby working class neighborhood of Nikiszowiec.

The building fits well into the context of Katowice but it is difficult to love it as it does not astonish everyone who looks at it. However, critics seem to forget that even the most advanced technology will age with time and brick, which is timeless, will always look good, especially here.

A slightly conservative facade hides one of the most modern interiors in the world. A large concert hall for 1,800 people, the heart of the space covered from the outside with form-works of concrete. When touching their structure you can feel prints left by wooden beams. But the interior stuns the viewer with its modernity and leading solutions, thanks to which you can see the musicians from behind. This is  because the seats are also placed on the other side of the stage.

Tomasz Konior divided the building into three zones. The first one is a ring for NOSPR musicians and employees, with a music hall for 300 people. It also has a library, room for section rehearsals, dressing rooms, offices, and technical facilities.

The second zone comprises an atrium for guests with cloak-rooms, ticket offices, a bistro and restaurant. The concert hall forms the third and the most important zone. It's made of black, wavy concrete reflecting sounds just like wooden elements and denoting the coloring of the Stradivarius violin. The parquet is from light oak, the ceiling and plafond of birch, the balcony railings of birch plywood. What is interesting is that the podium’s flooring consists of Alaskan cedar wood imported from Canada.

Polish Radio National Symphony Orchestra Interior Katowice

Polish Radio National Symphony Orchestra Interior Katowice

But what is the most ravishing in the concert hall is its great acoustics. The hall was personally attuned by the director of Nagata Acoustics, Yasushi Toyota. Not without significance was Krystian Zimerman's recommendation, the winner of the 1975 Chopin Competition. Zimerman, who visited Katowice in the autumn to rehearse before the opening concert did not hide his admiration for the work of Toyota. The architects make sure that the hall’s excellent acoustics will be even better after several months when the wood inlaid in the hall starts working.

The new hall must to attract the youngest. NOSPR directors hope that technological solutions will promote classical music among the generation that is now entering adulthood. This generation often, contrary to their parents, didn't have mandatory music lessons at primary school. The need to teach young Poles about classical music was also observed by the Institute of Music and Dance, which in 2014 in three Polish cities – Lublin, Rzeszow and Bialystok – implemented a programme for high school graduates “Philharmonic. Caution, It Draws You In!!!” Under the program, high school students received free tickets for 20 concerts that presented them with the arcana of the conductor’s work and specific nature of the philharmonic orchestra.

NOSPR is not the only new public utility facility in Katowice built in 2004. The building creates a so-called cultural axis with the new Silesian Museum and International Congress Center. The Silesian Museum building, designed by Austrian Riegler Riewe Architekten of Graz and constructed on the site of the former Katowice mine, was ready in 2014. It assumes an efficient use of underground space and slight interference with the post-industrial landscape, with glazed sections blending with it, thus allowing the exposition to be admired in daylight.

Near the NOSPR, on the other side of Olimpijska Street, the last finishing touches are being given to the International Congress Center with a capacity for 12,000 people. A green roof covers the building in the form of a dark cuboid, which descends along with a green valley dividing the building in two parts. The interiors form the main lobby, banquet and multi-functional room, auditorium and 18 smaller conference rooms.

Silesian Museum Katowice

Silesian Museum Katowice

Silesian Museum Katowice

In January 1929, when the Silesian Congress was bringing into being the Silesian Museum, probably no one expected the turbulent fate which awaited the seat of this institution. After the plebiscite of 1921 which resulted in a part of Silesia becoming part of Poland, the building of a museum in the capital of the region – Katowice – became a political issue.

It was necessary to create an institution that would handle the collecting of memorabilia and spiritual culture which made in Silesia, the presenting of these memorabilia and the popularizing of knowledge about the history of Silesia. The preparations for the building of the edifice of the new institution went on for a long time. The first competition was in 1929 and was never resolved. In 1934, Karol Schayer, the most important architect active in Silesia in those times, was finally entrusted with the designing of the edifice of the museum, which was to symbolize the region's independence.

Right next to the monumental form of the Silesian Congress, construction of a huge museum complex went under way in 1936. This museum complex had the shape of a letter H and had eight stories. Once this super-modern edifice equipped with elevators, escalators and photo-cells was one of the perfect examples of interwar modernism. In the summer of 1939 the construction work was over and the edifice was soon to be put into commission. That of course didn’t happen. In 1941 the Germans deconstructed the building. Today in its place a socialist-modernistic edifice stands, designed in the 50's by Aleksander Franta and Henryk Buszko.

For the next 40 years, the Upper Silesian Museum in Bytom played the role of the Silesian museum. The institution named Silesian Museum was reinstated as late as after 1984. The authorities assigned a 19th century hotel in Korfanty Avenue as seat of this museum. Though conveniently located, the building was too small for the needs of the institution. Therefore in 1986 the city announced a competition for a new building.

Back then a vision proposed by Jan Fiszer won. However the rights to the plot on which the museum was to be erected had not been secured and the project vanished. The makeshift Silesian Museum’s operations in a historical hotel – lasted until 2014, when construction of the institution’s new building finished.

Silesian Museum Gallery Katowice

Silesian Museum Gallery Katowice

New building for the Silesian Museum

Announcement of the international competition for the architectural concept of the new edifice of the Silesian Museum came in 2006. The competition encompassed not only the design of the museum’s building but also the design of the area surrounding this building. The museum was to be built on the site of the Coal Mine “Katowice”, shut down in 1999. The competition ended in June 2007. The 18 submitted designs were evaluated. The first award went to a proposition of the Riegler Riewe Architekten bureau from Graz.

The Austrians proposed to hide the exhibition spaces as far as 14 meters below the ground to expose the monuments that once were part of a mine and to create a public space surrounding the museum. Apart from new objects containing exhibition spaces, the designers also had to include historical objects in the design of the new complex. The machine room, the winding tower of the shaft “Warsaw” and the former clothing warehouse. The winding tower became an observation tower, the warehouse adapted for the needs of the Center for Polish Scenography. A restaurant opened in the machine house.

The main building of the museum has seven stories. Four of them are above ground (offices are there). Apart from this structure no new large objects appeared on the premises of the museum. Above ground one may only see glass boxes, through which the exhibition rooms are lit. These boxes are milky, semi-translucent. They resemble minimalistic lanterns sprouting from the post-industrial landscape. The silhouette of the mining shaft's tower dominates the whole architectural setting. It's a symbol most characteristic of Silesian landscapes.

Silesian Museum Interior Katowice

Silesian Museum Interior Katowice

"The heart” of the museum, the exhibitions, are below ground level. This has an easily readable symbolic meaning. After all, for centuries what was most precious in Silesia came from below the ground. In the underground part of the complex one may find exhibition spaces lit from above, conference rooms and educational rooms, a library, museum workshops, technical, storage and auxiliary rooms as well as the main hall which is large enough to accommodate a concert or spectacle. The complex was officially opened in 2015.

The Silesian Museum is near the famous Spodek, opposite the university campus and directly next to two other new and immensely important urban developments. Among them are the buildings of the Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra and the International Congress Center. Together with these developments the museum will create a complex of public utility objects, which will probably attract thousands of people and will be an important spot on the cultural and educational map of the region.

University of Economics in Katowice

University of Economics Katowice

University of Economics Katowice

The University of Economics in Katowice, founded in 1937, is the biggest and oldest business school in the region, and one of the top universities in Poland. Each year over 11 000 Polish and international students follow our degree programmes at the Bachelor, Master, Doctoral and Post-diploma levels at our five faculties: Business, Finance and Administration, Economics, Finance and Insurance, Informatics and Communication, and Management.

The students and graduates mature in a thriving metropolis and engage in developing the region in the course of their professional lives: managing companies, organizing socio-economic life, taking part in a range of business activities.

The educational offer and lifelong learning programmes attract students from all over the world and from every generation. Due to the balance between academic strength and soft skills in the courses as well as professional career services the employability of the graduates is very high. The university cherishes relations with there local and international alumni engaging them in many activities on campus and in social media. 

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